World Database of Nematodes

Linked to the Marine Biology Section, UGent

Nemys source details

Danovaro, R.; Gambi, M. C.; Dell'Anno, A.; Corinaldesi, C.; Fraschetti, S.; Vanreusel, A.; Vincx, M.; Gooday, A. J. (2008). Exponential decline of deep-sea ecosystem functioning linked to benthic biodiversity loss. Current Biology. 18(1): 1-8 + supplemental data: S1-S6; 1-16.
178920
10.1016/j.cub.2007.11.056 [view]
Danovaro, R.; Gambi, M. C.; Dell'Anno, A.; Corinaldesi, C.; Fraschetti, S.; Vanreusel, A.; Vincx, M.; Gooday, A. J.
2008
Exponential decline of deep-sea ecosystem functioning linked to benthic biodiversity loss
Current Biology
18(1): 1-8 + supplemental data: S1-S6; 1-16
Publication
NeMys doc_id: 17947
Available for editors  PDF available [request]
Background Recent investigations suggest that biodiversity loss might impair the functioning and sustainability of ecosystems. Although deep-sea ecosystems are the most extensive on Earth, represent the largest reservoir of biomass, and host a large proportion of undiscovered biodiversity, the data needed to evaluate the consequences of biodiversity loss on the ocean floor are completely lacking. Results Here, we present a global-scale study based on 116 deep-sea sites that relates benthic biodiversity to several independent indicators of ecosystem functioning and efficiency. We show that deep-sea ecosystem functioning is exponentially related to deep-sea biodiversity and that ecosystem efficiency is also exponentially linked to functional biodiversity. These results suggest that a higher biodiversity supports higher rates of ecosystem processes and an increased efficiency with which these processes are performed. The exponential relationships presented here, being consistent across a wide range of deep-sea ecosystems, suggest that mutually positive functional interactions (ecological facilitation) can be common in the largest biome of our biosphere. Conclusions Our results suggest that a biodiversity loss in deep-sea ecosystems might be associated with exponential reductions of their functions. Because the deep sea plays a key role in ecological and biogeochemical processes at a global scale, this study provides scientific evidence that the conservation of deep-sea biodiversity is a priority for a sustainable functioning of the worlds' oceans.
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2014-06-18 16:05:08Z
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Acantholaimus Allgén, 1933 (additional source)
Axonolaimidae Filipjev, 1918 (additional source)
Comesomatidae Filipjev, 1918 (additional source)
Desmoscolex Claparède, 1863 (additional source)
Draconematidae Filipjev, 1918 (additional source)
Halalaimus de Man, 1888 (additional source)
Oncholaimidae Filipjev, 1916 (additional source)
Oxystomina Filipjev, 1918 (additional source)
Oxystominidae Chitwood, 1935 (additional source)
Pandolaimidae Belogurov, 1980 (additional source)
Paralongicyatholaimus Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1950 (additional source)
Paramicrolaimidae Lorenzen, 1981 (additional source)
Phanodermatidae Filipjev, 1927 (additional source)
Pierrickia Vitiello, 1970 (additional source)
Pselionema Cobb, 1933 (additional source)
Ptycolaimellus accepted as Ptycholaimellus Cobb, 1920 (basis of record)
Syringolaimus de Man, 1888 (additional source)
Xyalidae Chitwood, 1951 (additional source)

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